Thursday, October 04, 2007

The other day Joan had a picture of her grandmother’s thread holder. As I have one just like it – it got me thinking about the treasures I have. There is this….
The thread holder. It's just like hers! It is intact with all the wires that hold the spools in place. I used it when I sewed a lot. Not so much anymore! But her Rattan basket does hold my sewing stuff today.
I also have this wonderful blanket on my wall. It was made in 1910 by Oregon City Woolen Mill. My father remembers it being on the end of his grandmothers bed. It is a featured blanket in a book called Legend of the Robe. I can’t believe I actually have this….my mother was cleaning closets out giving stuff to Goodwill and found it and gave it to my husband as a gift (She had no idea of its value as an historical piece) – so when we got divorced I demanded the blanket – he agreed as long as I promised to pass it down to our oldest. Duh!
This summer I have been working on restoring her wicker rocking chair. I had originally wanted to have it done to use it outside on the patio – but it was just finished this week. (Since it is raining now and the National Weather Service has issued a snow advisory - I doubt I'll be spending much time rocking on the patio!)I actually did very little of the work – there is a woman locally who does this and I worked with her a few times. But she did most of the work by far…what an intricate process to reweave the wicker. It’s now been primed and repainted and will be put away til next summer…can’t wait!
I have a few things that belonged to my Grandmother – her China and some silver pieces and a beautiful pin that I only wear at Christmas. They aren’t things I use everyday – but am very glad to have them when I need something special.

I do have all my mother’s knitting needles! Although I barely remember her knitting (She did do tons of needlepoint) she had quite a collection of knitting notions. I don’t use her straight needles very often – but she luckily had lots of circulars and dpns. My favorite sock needles were hers. I also have her wooden darning egg. She used it often darning dad’s socks. It sat in her sewing basket which is still beside her chair (although completely hidden by the piles of junk my Dad and his girl friend can’t seem to pick up!). Next time I go up there I’m going to rescue it.
The legacy these women passed to future generations is so special – they remind us of different times and different circumstances. Although my grandparents were wealthy for their times – they for the most part lived like they were still in the depression – everything had a function and purpose. They luckily passed that down to their children and hopefully I’ve still got that attitude! Wish there was some of the financial wealth left – but I’ve got the best of what they had to give! Great love for my family and a strong appreciation for what I have.

5 comments:

Joan said...

I love the pincushion on yours. I definitely have to replace the dumb tomato on mine. Yours is darker wood but isn't it nice to keep things in the family?

Pat K said...

A very enjoyable post! Isn't it great to have some wonderful things passed down? Especially if you can still use them now.

Roxie said...

Yeah, it's hard to have been raised with plenty, then to have to make do with less. But even in our reduced circumstances, we are living better than 99% of the world. And we got love and good educations and memories that will comfort us when we are older than your grandmother's pincushion. That Pendleton blanket is fabulous!! What a treasure. And the wicker rocker - awesome. MY grannie had a wicker sewing basket. I wonder whatever happened to it? It had a tassel with some Chinese cash tied in. Funny how some things get printed so vividly in the memory.

Devorah said...

Thank you for sharing those bits of your history. It is wonderful to see memories still in use.

Rhonda the Stitchingnut said...

Family's small treasures are the best. I really must document mine. They are very special. Love your post. Memories are worth far more than money.